PERL's News Blog

perl presentations at AEA 2021

Congratulations Corinne! We just got word today that Corinne’s thesis is officially in press, to be available onlie with a doi within the next few days. Here’s the citation so far:

Kacmarek, C. N., Yates, B. T., Nich, C., & Kiluk, B. D. (2021). A pilot economic evaluation of computerized cognitive behavioral therapy for alcohol use disorder as an addition and alternative to traditional therapy. 

Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research, 45(5), 1109-1121

 doi.org/10.1111/acer.14601


Corinne’s thesis published!

Congratulations Corinne! We just got word today that Corinne’s thesis is officially in press, to be available onlie with a doi within the next few days. Here’s the citation so far:

Kacmarek, C. N., Yates, B. T., Nich, C., & Kiluk, B. D. (2021). A pilot economic evaluation of computerized cognitive behavioral therapy for alcohol use disorder as an addition and alternative to traditional therapy. 

Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research, 45(5), 1109-1121

 doi.org/10.1111/acer.14601


presentations by Alexis, Phoebe, Corinne, at ABCT 2020

French, A., Yates, B. T., "Costs, Cost-Effectiveness, and Cost-Benefit of Attachment Biobehavioral Catch-up (ABC) Intervention," Annual meeting fo the Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies (ABCT), ABCT, Philadelphia (virtually). Scope: International. Refereed. (November 20, 2020)


McCutchan, P. K., Yates, B. T., Jobes, D., "Cost, Cost-Effectiveness, and Cost-Benefit of Collaborative Assessment and Management of Suicidality versus Enhanced Care as Usual in an Active Duty Military Population," annual meeting of the Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies (ABCT), ABCT, Philadelphia, PA (virtually). Scope: International. Refereed. (November 20, 2020)


Kacmarek, C. N., Yates, B. T., "Do the Benefits Outweigh the Costs? Computerized Cognitive Behavioral Therapy Compared to Standard Treatment for Alcohol Use Do the Benefits Outweigh the Costs? Computerized Cognitive Behavioral Therapy Compared to Standard Treatment for Alcohol Use," annual meeting of the Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies (ABCT), ABCT, Philadelphia, PA (virtually). Scope: International. Refereed. (November 20, 2020)


Wasil, A., Osborn, T., Yates, B. T., DeRubeis, R., "Evaluating the cost-effectiveness of an online single-session intervention for depression among Kenyan adolescents," annual meeting of the Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies (ABCT), ABCT, Philadelphia, PA (virtually). Scope: International. Refereed. (November 20, 2020)

Alexis, Phoebe, Corinne, Brian, and colleagues presented at ABCT 2020

Symposia Cost-Effectiveness and Cost-Benefit Analyses of CBT and Alternative Interventions for Childhood Attachment, Anxiety, Depression, Alcohol Abuse, and Suicide Prevention: Methods as Well as Findings was presented at ABCT's 54th Annual Convention  held virtually, with great attendance, Friday November 20, 2020.

This symposium proposed and chaired by Dr. Brian Yates included presentations of thesis and dissertation research conducted at PERL by Alexis French, Phoebe McCutchan, Corinne Kacmarek, and by colleagues Dr. Alessandro De Nadai (Texas State University) and Akash Wasil (University of Pennsylvania). Dr. Michael Freed (NIMH, former PERL member!)servde as Discussant. All presentations were pre-recorded and remaining available on the ABCT conference website for some time.

According to ABCT tech support, 229 people attended the symposium at its start. Hopefully, even more eventually got to see and hear our presentations!

Brian gives invited colloquia at Yale, U Delaware

In March and April, Brian gave invited colloquia to the clinical psychology programs at Yale University (in New Haven CT) and at the University of Delaware (in Newark DE).

Both colloquia were titled, “Improving Outcomes and Reducing Costs of Psychological Interventions: Toward Delivering the Best to the Most for the Least."

Jay is Assistant Professor of Psychiatry at BU School of Medicine

Yes, aluma Dr. Jay Gorman is now an Assistant Professor of Psychiatry at the Boston University School of Medicine. Congrats, Jay!

Brian publishes with economics colleagues

Accepted December 30, 2018, for publication in 2019 in the journal Social Work and Social Sciences Review, with Dr.’s Mary Hansen (AU’s Dept of Economics) and Ashely Rovencher as first and second authors respectively, this Hansen, Provencher, and Yates publication should appear in 2019. Brian designed and did the qualitative work, including data collection and analysis, using his Resources → Activities → Processes → Outcomes → $ Outcomes model as a guide.

PERL presents at ABCT!

Yes! We presented some of our most recent work and findings at the 2018 conference of the Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies (ABCT) in Washington, DC. Here’s the program entries for our symposium:

(Symposium 95) Adding to the CBT Evidence Database: Including Costs, and Benefits, for Cost-Effectiveness and Cost-Benefit Analyses

Saturday, November 17, 20181:45 PM - 3:15 PMRoom: Virginia B, Lobby Level

Brian T. Yates, Ph.D.

Alexis N. French, M.A. - American University

Corinne Kacmarek, M.A. - American University

Lana Wald, Ph.D. - Program Evaluation Research Lab, American University

Michael C. Freed, Ph.D. - National Institute of Mental Health (Discussant)


Including costs and benefits in research on CBT and alternative treatments provides empirical, quantitative, and comprehensive answers to the increasingly common questions of not only “Does it work?” but “How much does it cost?” and “Is it worth it?”

This symposium provides solutions to these problems by illustrating how to assess costs, benefits, and more socially meaningful outcomes in CBT and other treatments using real data collected in federally-funded field study and two randomized clinical trials (RCTs).

The first presentation introduces attendees to terms and methods of cost-inclusive research by a seasoned researcher who has published extensively in the area.

The second presentation describes how a CBT program for enhancing parenting skills was delivered in clinics, as had been the norm, and in homes, as had been an emerging practice for clients who were challenging to engage. Providers perceived their costs home training to be higher than clinic training, but clients saw costs of receiving training in their homes as lower than receiving the same training in clinics. Who is right and which delivery site generates the better outcomes, as well as the lower costs for society, are questions that pivot on which stakeholder perspective is emphasized in costing methods.

Computer programs have been used as adjuncts or alternatives to in-person eclectic therapy for significant health, mental health, and substance abuse disorders. Measuring and comparing costs, cost-effectiveness, and cost-benefit is becoming essential in research comparing computer- to human-provided CBT. If human providers’ time is valued according to market rates reflecting the value of their training and experience, but computer-based therapy is valued without including costs of developing those programs, we may underestimate the costs of using “CBT” to provide CBT (CBT4CBT). This study statistically compared costs, benefits, cost-effectiveness, and cost-benefit for CBT4CBT versus traditional treatment for alcohol abuse with alternative methods of costing the development of CBT4CBT affect those findings.

Valuing client time devoted to treatment can seem as easy as valuing provider time: typically, minutes spent are multiplied by market pay rate for the client or provider. But what if the opportunity cost of client time can be argued to be nil for a treatment that needs to be re-administered every winter (light therapy), while client and provider time for an alternative treatment (CBT) is finite and for a single winter? This study found multiple solutions to this opportunity-costing problem common in self-directed versus therapy-based health care regimens, with implications for cost, cost-effectiveness, and cost-benefit for CBT for Seasonal Affective Disorder (CBT-SAD) versus light therapy.



Learning Objectives:

  1. This session is designed to help you learn how to measure and include costs of CBT and alternative treatments in your research.
  2. This session is designed to help you learn how to measure and include generic nonmonetary outcomes, and benefits, of CBT and alternative treatments
  3. This session is designed to help you learn the essential differences between costs, cost-effectiveness analysis, and cost-benefit analysis.
  4. This session is designed to aid understanding of the advantages of adding costs, generic outcomes, monetary benefits to your research
  5. This session is designed to help you understand how cost-effectiveness and cost-benefit analysis could be included in your clinical trials.

Brian also presents a mini-workshop at ABCT

Yep, although whittled down by program needs from 3 to 1.5 hours, Brian presented a truncated version of his workshop. Programe entry below…

(Research and Professional Development 10) Adding Cost Data to Make Your Research More Impactful (and Used): Cost-Effectiveness, Cost- Benefit, Cost-Utility Analyses for Psychological Treatments

Sunday, November 18, 201810:15 AM - 11:45 AMRoom: Madison B, Mezzanine Level

Brian T. Yates, Ph.D.

Measuring and analyzing costs of treatment and prevention programs – to clients as well as providers – can be the missing element that converts a good idea into research that is funded, published, and used. Evaluating the monetary outcomes (aka “benefits”) of programs, such as reduced client use of health services and increased client productivity and income, also can influence funders and policy-makers. You will finish this session being able to explain why including costs in clinical research is essential. You also will be able to explain key differences between cost, cost-effectiveness, cost-utility, and cost-benefit analyses. Examples from published studies of behavioral and cognitive-behavioral treatment and prevention programs are used throughout.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Explain essential differences between research reporting costs, cost-effectiveness, cost-utility, and cost-benefit.
  2. Measure costs and benefits (monetary outcomes) as experienced by multiple interest groups, including clients as well as providers.
  3. “Cost-out” provider and client time consumed by treatment activities, considering ethical issues in this additional data collection.
  4. Measure costs of treatment or prevention programs with multiple components, for which only some data on resource use is available.
  5. Communicate findings from cost-effectiveness, cost-utility, and cost-benefit analyses to lay as well as professional audiences using readily-understood graphs as well as detailed tables and statistical analyses.
  6. Anticipate, recognize, and avoid or recover from resistance to measuring and reporting costs as well as cost-effectiveness, cost-utility, and cost-benefit relationships.

Alexis’s thesis published!

Yes! Our very own Alexis French, M.A. (and well on her way to her Ph.D.) has just had her thesis accepted for publication! Reference currently is:

French, A. N., Yates, B. T., & Fowles, T. R. (2018). Cost-effectiveness of Parent-Child Interaction Therapy in clinics versus homes: Client, provider, administrator, and overall Perspectives. Journal of Child and Family Studies.1-16. viewable at https://doi.org/10.1007/s10826-018-1159-4

2013 November 18: Clubhouse model being researched by Jay Gorman, Kathleen Calcerano, and Brian Yates featured in SAMHSA” Behavioral Health 2012”

http://www.samhsa.gov/data/2012BehavioralHealthUS/2012-BHUS.pdf


© Brian T. Yates 2017